Walking 006

Our many faces. I am enjoying making these line drawing faces. It makes me ponder how something can be sweet and joyful while a bit rebellious. Maybe the whole Disneyland influence on the catwalk (did you see Opening Ceremony's recent show?) is creeping in? Probably not.

This is Walking. These are visual conclusions to one-hour of making. There is no prompt or brief, no preconceived goal. Things may be incomplete and unfinished, unresolved. Materials, tools and process change frequently.

 

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Art is Emotion

The second week of my continuing ed classes at Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design was wonderful. It's nice to be back in an art school setting, meeting new people with creativity as our commonality. Here's what went down:

 

Experimental Drawing _ Automatic Drawing
The Surrealists inspired experimental drawing this week. Discussion about Salvador Dali's work inspired an "Automatic" drawing. With three pens taped together I made gestural strokes and loops that created the abstract base of the drawing. Then I went in with gray graphite charcoal and "found" things within this nest of pen marks to emphasize or turn into a surreal world. I created a landscape with animals and eyes. You don't plan, edit or second guess yourself in the process, just draw. I really love that. And the joy I felt in the process shows, I think.

 Automatic Drawing March 2018

Automatic Drawing March 2018

 Automatic drawing detail. See abstract pen base, creates lines that form the image.

Automatic drawing detail. See abstract pen base, creates lines that form the image.


Then we were asked to write down something in our lives that made a big impact. I wrote this:

 my dog bailey died.

my dog bailey died.

Last year my best friend of 13 years, a beautiful Australian Cattle dog named Bailey, died. I still have emotion and grief surrounding this loss, and I'm teary even as I type. After writing this impactful event on paper, we were asked to stand in front of large pieces of paper on the wall and draw with charcoal taped to the end of a long stick, relinquishing precise control over the drawing instrument. I began drawing tear shapes, not only for the sad tears that were bubbling up in me, but also to represent Mr. Bailey's insatiable thirst. He struggled with Cushing's disease at the end of his life which made him always pant and feel thirsty. And then I naturally fell into drawing his form. After most of the drawing was established by the long stick method, we were allowed to work the drawing up close by hand with a very large piece of charcoal. By that time I was pretty emotional, and the dark heavy desperate marks show it.

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There was time for a second drawing, and I wanted to keep it lighter. I used the same long stick with charcoal end. I intentionally drew the lines very slowly and very lightly. I'm not specifically intending this to be angelic, but more of an emotion of being set free.

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ If you have lost a beloved animal friend, my sympathy goes out to you. ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

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Make Believe, Draw
Whew, that was heavy. If you've made it this far, you're in for a colorful treat. In the Make Believe, Draw class we used colored paper, pastels and crayons to draw faces. Lots of imaginary faces! The first of the bunch were collaborative; we all sat around a table like kids and started drawing and passed it along after very short time. The results were fabulous, and a culmination of about 12 really creative people. And it was sooo much fun.

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Finally, we drew faces all by ourselves. These characters were based on a range; of those that might help and those that might obstruct.

These were drawn entirely by myself with pastel and crayon:

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Make Believe, Experimental Draw and Paint: Week 1

Last week I started a few continuing education courses. Six weeks, three classes. Introduction to Acrylic Painting, Experimental Drawing, and Make Believe, Draw. I'll share a bit of what I learned and made each week.

Intro to Acrylic Painting

I'm new to acrylic painting. I've done tons of painting with watercolor, gouache, ink and dyes for commercial design, but really never engaged with opaque paint on canvas in a fine art context. This introduction class will cover the fundamentals and help me become less awkward handling paint and an palette. It will be primarily painting still life from observation. This first week we discussed value and only used black and white paint to keep it beginner basic. We painted a value chart, and a quick still life study of metal objects. This is a 5x7" canvas painted in about 20 minutes with one size flat brush. I loved painting it. And even with all its flaws, I'm hooked and I'm really looking forward to painting more.

 Focus on black and white value, twenty minute painted acrylic still life.

Focus on black and white value, twenty minute painted acrylic still life.

 

Experimental Drawing

Then it was Experimental Drawing. Along with exploring unique drawing processes, the class is focusing on developing community among the members of the class. In the first week we developed collaborative drawings. Each member of the class drew with a different colored stabilo pen to build up a symphony of lines. These are just three of the group. It's interesting to see the personality of each person within their color, and how they relate.

 Experimental Drawing - collaborative pen drawing 1

Experimental Drawing - collaborative pen drawing 1

 Experimental Drawing - collaborative pen drawing 2

Experimental Drawing - collaborative pen drawing 2

 Experimental Drawing - collaborative pen drawing 3

Experimental Drawing - collaborative pen drawing 3

 

Make Believe, Draw.

Finally the third class called Make Believe, Draw. As the title might suggest, it's a class that will emphasize drawing from imagination. This first week we discussed early cultures (that didn't have photographic technology) and cave paintings, among other things. In that spirit, the walls were covered in brown drawing paper, and we drew all over it with charcoal and chalk. We were asked to think about animals and humans, perhaps their combination, and draw what came to our minds. I have had a thing for snakes lately, and making up new creatures is so fun.

We then worked on human facial features, a brief lesson on facial anatomy and structure, and drew imaginary faces. To be continued in color next week.

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Walking 005

I'm starting a club... Sister Snakes. Silk bomber jackets with embroidery on the back. I will go back to this one and craft some slick lettering.

This is Walking. These are visual conclusions to one-hour of making. There is no prompt or brief, no preconceived goal. Things may be incomplete and unfinished, unresolved. Materials, tools and process change frequently.

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Walking 003

It's a gray and drizzly Monday. This is Walking, These are visual conclusions to one-hour of making. There is no prompt or brief, no preconceived goal. Things may be incomplete and unfinished, unresolved. Materials, tools and process change frequently.

 Walking 003 Talis Outside of Cages 180122

Walking 003 Talis Outside of Cages 180122

Walking 002

This one is unusual for me. Although, my irl sketchbook is full of snakes and eyes...

 Walking 002 Snake Eyes 180118

Walking 002 Snake Eyes 180118

WalkING 001

These are visual conclusions to one-hour of making. There is no prompt or brief, no preconceived goal. Things may be incomplete and unfinished, unresolved. Materials, tools and process change frequently.

Inspired by Mitch Goldstein and Anne Jordan at RIT. They started their Walking project focused on the habit of making.

 

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